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Know Before You Sign

CNA Dues Calculator

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According to CNA's constitution and bylaws, union members can expect to pay 1.015% of their regular earnings towards union dues. This means that each time union members get a raise, more of their money will be spent on union dues.

SEIU-UHW Dues Calculator

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According to SEIU-UHW's constitution and bylaws, union members can expect to pay 2.0% of their regular earnings towards union dues. This means that each time union members get a raise, more of their money will be spent on union dues.

Know Before You Sign

Remember! Always read the fine print whenever you are asked to sign something!

In fact, signing a union card is your Authorization for Union Representation by a union. By signing, you say you want the union to be your representative. As your representative, the union will expect dues from you — hundreds of dollars a year — as payment. If the union supporters didn't show you that, or if you believe you were pressured into signing, or if you just changed your mind, you can take it back. For more information, please see one of our "Changed Your Mind?" flyers.

Whether or not you've signed a card that authorizes the union to be your bargaining representative, here are some important questions to ask those who are soliciting your signature and support:

What will it cost me?

  • How much are union dues?
  • Will you guarantee that you won’t demand a union security clause in the contract that would force everyone to pay full union dues? Could I lose my job if I don’t pay?
  • Does this union call strikes? How much could that cost me?

What will I get?

  • Can you guarantee me a pay increase or benefit protections?
  • Does your union have benefits or will my benefits still come from St. Joseph Health?
  • Can you guarantee I will have job security?

What are the risks?

  • Can a union contract actually mean I might lose benefits I already have?
  • I have special work-time needs. Could I lose the flexibility to work out my schedule with my colleagues and my manager if a union contract provides for different working arrangements?
  • If I decide I have to work instead of going on strike, could it be intimidating to cross the picket line?
  • Could I be fined or charged by the union for not choosing to strike?
  • Who will speak for me? What happens to my voice? What could this do to my relationship with my manager?